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Cadillac-V2I-Development-01: Cadillac CTS development vehicles alert drivers of potential red-light violations via the infotainment system using Vehicle-to-Infrastructure communications.
Cadillac tests V2I capability on Michigan public roads

Cadillac’s CTS sedan, one of the first production vehicles in the world to contain Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) communication, recently conducted successful demonstrations of Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) capability in Michigan. V2I connects vehicles to the surrounding infrastructure, allowing the vehicle to alert the driver of safety, mobility, or environment-related conditions ahead.

CTS development vehicles received real-time data from traffic controllers on signal phasing and timing during successful demonstrations recently conducted in collaboration with Michigan road agencies. The traffic signals, located adjacent to the GM Warren Technical Center campus, sent real-time data using Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) protocol to the development vehicles, which alerted the drivers of a potential red-light violation at current speed. This alert could help avoid the potentially dangerous decision to brake abruptly or accelerate through a busy intersection.

Vehicles do not transmit any identifying information such as VIN number, registration or MAC address, in their messages. For example, if a connected car runs a red light, the traffic signal may be able to say someone ran a red light, but will not be able to say who or what vehicle. Firewalls and other measures ensure the DSRC signals cannot be interfered with and are only exchanged between the vehicle and the infrastructure.

“When cars can talk to the infrastructure, the benefits will rise exponentially. For example, V2I-enabled red lights won’t hold up traffic when they’re not needed, and highly accurate, real-time traffic updates will help further reduce congestion—which we all know creates driver frustration and waste,” said General Motors CEO Mary Barra at the 2014 Intelligent Transport Society Congress “The sooner the industry puts a critical mass of V2V-equipped vehicles on the road, the more accidents we’ll prevent… and the more society—and individual drivers—will benefit. The same holds true for V2I.”

The Michigan Department of Transportation, Macomb Country Department of Roads, and General Motors’ Research & Development are collaborating to showcase leadership in the connected and automated vehicle environment.

For more on this subject, view this episode of “SAE Eye on Engineering” by Automotive Engineering Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke.

Cadillac-V2I-Development-01: Cadillac CTS development vehicles alert drivers of potential red-light violations via the infotainment system using Vehicle-to-Infrastructure communications.